Additional information and support

There have been great efforts to advance the understanding of ADHD by a variety of professionals. They share my desire and dedication to support and empower individuals with ADHD. These collective efforts have helped people begin to understand brain function, raised awareness of the complexities of ADHD, and highlighted resources for people to explore. First, let’s take a brief look at ADHD.

 

What is ADD/ADHD?

Daily challenges of living with ADHD

  • Limited ability to focus on a task or effectively shift focus
  • Getting started on and/or completing tasks
  • Forgetfulness
  • Creating and establishing daily routines
  • Effectively managing unscheduled time
  • Leaving home on time with everything you need
  • Losing or misplacing things
  • Difficulty preparing for important tasks
  • Getting sidetracked
  • Procrastination unless under the pressure of a deadline

A brief history

ADHD is brain-based condition that can impact many aspects of daily life—responsibilities, careers, relationships and self-confidence to name a few. Decades ago, ADHD was thought to be a childhood condition characterized by physical restlessness: hyperactivity, distractibility, and inattention. However, research has expanded the definition of ADHD to include three different types/presentations: predominately hyperactive (physically restless), predominately inattentive (mentally restless) and combined (both physically and mentally restless). Studies have also shown that approximately 60% of children will carry some of the symptoms of ADHD throughout their life. The degree of interference created by the ADHD varies for each individual and even within families

Because of these scientific advances, parents recognize their own lifelong challenges during their child’s evaluation, and adults are seeking to understand why performing what seems to be simple tasks for others has evaded their mastery. A formal evaluation by a qualified mental health practitioner is the first step. Once formally identified, intervention options identified for ADHD vary by age may include: medication, psychotherapy (individual/couple), school and workplace accommodations and coaching.

How ADHD affects life skills

One of the more recent discoveries is the presence of inconsistent executive function skills. These skills, which are under development until the age of 30, help us regulate our thoughts and actions to accomplish our daily tasks and responsibilities. Executive functions help us plan, prioritize, organize, remember, manage time, see tasks to completion and regulate our emotions. Consequently, these skills impact every aspect of a person’s life, daily roles and responsibilities. 

Help from an expert

Given the complexity of ADHD, you'll find it worthwhile to work with a credentialed ADHD coach who has the specialized knowledge and training to help you accomplish your goals. 


Websites

add.org

Information, resources and networking opportunities for adults with ADHD

additudemag.com

Articles and resources for adults and children with ADHD and learning disabilities

addwarehouse.com

Books, videos, and other ADHD related merchandise

chadd.org

Education, support, and advocacy for children and adults with ADHD

 

help4adhd.org

Information about ADHD – check out their “What We Know” fact sheets


Local meetings

Pittsburgh and Vicinity Adult CHADD

Monthly meetings provide educational speakers and discussion

Pittsburgh and Vicinity
Parent CHADD 

Monthly meetings provide parents with education and support

Pittsburgh and Vicinity College Student CHADD 

Meetings held the last TH, of the month 6-7pm at Western Psychiatric Institute (WPIC) provide educational speakers, discussion and support


Books on ADHD

For adults

   A New Understanding of ADHD in Adults and Children: Executive Function Impairments   by Thomas Brown, PhD


A New Understanding of ADHD in Adults and Children: Executive Function Impairments
by Thomas Brown, PhD

   ADD-Friendly Ways   to Organize Your Life   by Judith Kohlberg & Kathleen Nadeau


ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life 
by Judith Kohlberg & Kathleen Nadeau

   Answers to Distraction   by Edward M. Hallowell & John J. Ratey


Answers to Distraction 
by Edward M. Hallowell &
John J. Ratey

   Is it You, Me, or Adult ADD?   by Gina Pera


Is it You, Me, or Adult ADD? 
by Gina Pera

     Married to Distraction   by Edward M. Hallowell & Sue George Hallowell

 

Married to Distraction 
by Edward M. Hallowell &
Sue George Hallowell

   More Attention, Less Deficit   by Ari Tuckman


More Attention, Less Deficit 
by Ari Tuckman

 
 

For parents

   Late, Lost and Unprepared: A Parents Guide to Helping Children with Executive Functioning  by Joyce Cooper Kahn, PhD & Laurie Dietzel, PhD


Late, Lost and Unprepared: A Parents Guide to Helping Children with Executive Functioning
by Joyce Cooper Kahn, PhD & Laurie Dietzel, PhD

   Smart but Scattered  by Richard Guare, PhD & Peg Dawson, EdD


Smart but Scattered
by Richard Guare, PhD
& Peg Dawson, EdD

   Smart but Stuck: Emotions in Teens and Adults with ADHD  by Thomas Brown, PhD


Smart but Stuck: Emotions in Teens and Adults with ADHD by Thomas Brown, PhD

   Taking Charge of ADHD The Complete Authoritative Guide for Parents  by Russell Barkley, PhD


Taking Charge of ADHD
The Complete Authoritative Guide for Parents

by Russell Barkley, PhD